Ocean Shore RR Map, Circa Unknown

map11

 

If you cannot read the names of the towns/places, here they are, north to south along the coastline. A few names are new to me, and I note that Torquay is not mentioned.
San Francisco
Omondaga [Please read John’s email below]
Daly City
Thornton
Mussel Rock
Edgemar
Salada
Brighton
Vallemar
Rockaway
Tobin
Green Canyon (see story below)
Montara
Farallone
Moss Beach
Marine
Princeton
North Granada
GRANADA
South Granada
Miramar
Half Moon
Arleta
Purisima
Lobitos
TUNITAS
San Gregorio
Pescadero
Pebble Beach
Pigeon Point
New Years Pt,
Waddell Beach
Scott
Scott (repeated again)
Davenport Landing
Blue Gum
Davenport
Lidell
Yellowbank
Lagos
Enright
SCARONI
Parson’s Beach
WilderR
Rapett
Then we’re out of San Mateo County and into Santa Cruz, so I’m not going to mention anything there, not much anyway.

Other moew familiar San Mateo County places named to the east of the Pacific Ocean include:
San Bruno, San Mateo, ,Redwood, Palo Alto, La Honda, Bellevale, Big Basin, Swanton and Folger

Very interesting, isn’t it?
———-

From John Vonderlin

Email John (benloudman@sbcglobal.net)

Hi June,
   Omondaga should be Onondaga. It was a street in San Francisco that must have been a stop on the OSR. Below is a line about it from the 1910 S.F. Street Guide. Maybe that was the first ocean shore stop on the Ocean Shore Railroad?
I’ve got a picture of the depot, and a map of its route. I’ll check it out. Enjoy. John
 
 Onondaga Avenue (West End Tract), from W s Mission nr Russia Av, N W to Ocean Av 
  Onondaga, New York was the capital and central area of what we  call “The Six Nations of the Iroquois.” The Wikipedia article on “Iroqouis” helped me remember some of my Back East grammar school history and helped me understand somewhat why a street in San Francisco would be named in the 1800s for a Native American tribe.   
————————————-
From JohnVonderlin
Email John (benloudman@sbcglobal.net)
United States Geological Survey (USGS) map of Tobin, Pacifica
tobin
{Note: Working for the OSRR  Railroad Could Be Dangerous–and here is an excellent example.]
From John Vonderlin
Email John (benloudman@sbcglobal.neet)
i June,
  Here’s another old newspaper story about Green Canyon. The ever-so-lucky Mr. Nggard, mentioned in the article, probably remembered this week for the rest of his life. After being beaten and robbed, and not killed only because he landed on an unseen ledge when thrown over a cliff, he left the Wild West of the OSR labor camps and headed back to the relatively safe and civilized Big City. Only to have the Great Quake and its devastating fires occur just a couple of days later. Was it a case of jumping from the frying pan into the fire? I hope not. Enjoy. John
 
THROW WORKMAN
OFF A CLIFF
Thugs Kick  Railroad-Man
Till Insensible, Rob Him
and Then  Try To Do Murder
SAVED BY LEDGE
Victim Lands Upon Projec
tion Twenty Feet From Top
 and Escapes Awful Death
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. April.  l3
John  Nggard, a workman employed on
the  Ocean Shore Railroad has  brought
here news, of a most sensational incident
in which  he figured  as the central figure,
and in which, he almost  lost his life.
   A few days  ago he was paid a
small  sum of money due him by the
railroad  company. He repaired to a
saloon  nearby and bought several
drinks. On  leaving the  place he did
not  notice three or four evil-looking
fellows who were  loitering about the
place,  Had he done so he would have
escaped a thrilling experience.
  The saloon  is  in Green Canyon, where
the cliffs descend .more than one hun-
dred  feet. The footpads followed
Nggard, kicked him into insensibility,
robbed him, and threw  him over the
bank. Fortunately, the man  fell upon
a projecting ledge on the cliff, about
twenty feet from  the top. How long
he remained there no one knows, but he
was discovered by some of his fellow
workmen, and after much difficulty res-
cued.
   Disreputable characters infest the en-
tire  region on the route of the Ocean
Shore Railroad and outrages of various
kinds are of frequent occurrence.

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About June Morrall

1947 - 2010
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